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Why companies can't hire Data Scientists?

There are about 2,500 Data Scientists in Boston. Indeed.com displays 1,643 job listings for Data Scientists in Boston. That means that there are around 1.5 Data Scientist jobs per candidate. But not all Data Scientists in Boston are looking to switch jobs. According to data analyzed by my company, Talenya, only 227 of the 2,500 are likely to be open to new opportunities. That’s more than 7 jobs per candidate! This is what the “the war for talent” looks like and it gets worse.
Assuming you’re a small, growing company looking to hire Data Scientists in Boston, you will be competing for talent against giants like Amazon (123 openings), Pfizer (42 openings) and Biogen (35 openings).
While the small companies are willing to pay around $120,000 for a Data Scientist with a few years of experience, the big guys are willing to pay $160,000 - $230,000.  If you’re a Data Scientist, which job are you going to take?
What can the small companies do to attract Data Scientists? To start with, they must …

Knock, knock knocking on Talent‘s Door

Imagine you were looking to buy a house in a specific neighborhood. The problem, however, is that you have no idea how many houses are in the neighborhood, how many are for sale, the going prices and the demand for these houses. You could post an ad online and ask people to call you. But this strategy is unlikely to generate the response you are looking for. You could retain a realtor but realtors have no information which people are considering listing their house. I am giving you this analogy because the challenges in recruitment are not very different. 95% of the people that companies look to hire for critical jobs are not looking for a job. Traditional recruitment doesn’t work because it’s like roaming around the neighborhood knocking on doors, seeing if the owners are interested in selling. Recruiters typically search for talent on LinkedIn and contact people that seem like a good fit. They contact them one by one, hoping one of them will be interested in their offer. It is sad to …

Are there good candidates in the market?

Are there good candidates in the market?
A recent study published by CB Insight indicates a number of common reasons that startups fail. The
 first and second are not surprising: 42% of startups close because they found no market for their products and 29% because they ran out of money. But the most solvable reason is the third: 23% of startups fail because of an inadequate team. Obviously, these companies didn’t put the right people in place to do the job that needed doing
Entrepreneurs set up a company, develop an amazing product which the market is waiting for, raise funding and yet, one out of four startups close because the team was not suited for the tremendous challenges entrepreneurs and startups face. So even while the 3rd most common reason startups fail can be attributed to not having the right team in place, the first two reasons can also be partially attributed to having the wrong people executing those tasks. It’s sort of obvious to me. Not having the right team is arguably …